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Why Boredom Is Anything but Boring

By Maggie Koerth-Baker — 2016

Implicated in everything from traumatic brain injury to learning ability, boredom has become extremely interesting to scientists.

Read on www.scientificamerican.com

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How Are The Mind & The Brain Different? A Neuroscientist Explains

So what exactly is the difference between the mind and the brain? Well, the mind is separate, yet inseparable from, the brain. The mind uses the brain, and the brain responds to the mind.

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Largest Ever Psychedelics Study Maps Changes of Conscious Awareness to Neurotransmitter Systems

In the world’s largest study on psychedelics and the brain, a team of researchers from The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital) and Department of Biomedical Engineering of McGill University, the Broad Institute at Harvard/MIT, SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, and Mila—Quebec...

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How We All Could Benefit from Synaesthesia

Developing the mysterious condition in the 96% of people who do not have it may help to improve learning skills, aid recovery from brain injury and guard against mental decline in old age

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Is Synesthesia a Brain Disorder?

In a provocative review paper, French neuroscientists Jean-Michel Hupé and Michel Dojat question the assumption that synesthesia is a neurological disorder.

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Pseudo-Hallucinations: Why Some People See More Vivid Mental Images than Others—Test Yourself Here

Ganzflicker is known to elicit the experience of anomalous sensory information in the external environment, called pseudo-hallucinations.

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What Psychedelic Mushrooms Are Teaching Us About Human Consciousness

Psychedelic drugs like psilocybin are being tested to treat mental illness. They're also expanding our understanding about human consciousness.

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Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

In mice and one person, scientists were able to reproduce the altered state often associated with ketamine by inducing certain brain cells to fire together in a slow, rhythmic fashion.

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Scientists Look At The Strange "Half-Dead" State Of Meditating Buddhist Monks

In Tibetan Buddhism, there’s a mystical concept known as “thukdam” or “tukdam,” in which an experienced meditator can slip into a state of mind said to be accessible at the time of death.

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The Neuroscience of . . . Birth

In this article, we take a look at the numerous changes affecting a mother’s brain before and after birth, and then consider why so little research has been conducted on the brain during birth.

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Polyvagal Theory and How It Relates to Social Cues

We innately long for feelings of safety, trust, and comfort in our connections with others and quickly pick up cues that tell us when we may not be safe.

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Neuroscience