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Albert Camus



Albert Camus (1913–1960) was a French author, journalist, philosopher and Nobel Prize winner. His writings contributed to the rise of absurdism, and though he was often considered an existentialist, he rejected that description and remained critical of the philosophy.

Albert Camus
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The Plague

A haunting tale of human resilience and hope in the face of unrelieved horror, Albert Camus’ iconic novel about an epidemic ravaging the people of a North African coastal town is a classic of twentieth-century literature.

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The Stranger

With the intrigue of a psychological thriller, Camus's masterpiece gives us the story of an ordinary man unwittingly drawn into a senseless murder on an Algerian beach.

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The Myth of Sisyphus

One of the most influential works of this century, The Myth of Sisyphus—featured here in a stand-alone edition—is a crucial exposition of existentialist thought.

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FindCenter Quotes ImageDon’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Walk beside me; just be my friend.

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The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt

By one of the most profoundly influential thinkers of our century, The Rebel is a classic essay on revolution.

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The Fall

Elegantly styled, Camus' profoundly disturbing novel of a Parisian lawyer's confessions is a searing study of modern amorality.

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PHILOSOPHY - Albert Camus

The only real question of philosophy is whether or not we should commit suicide, said Albert Camus.

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FindCenter Quotes ImageYou will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.

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Camus’s Inoculation Against Hate

Writing “The Plague” in the form of a historical “chronicle” was a hopeful gesture, implying human continuity, a vessel to carry the memory of war as an inoculation against future armed conflicts.

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Albert Camus, Nobel Prize Speech 1957

Albert Camus Nobel Prize Speech 1957

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