Teacher

Christine Caldwell



Christine Caldwell, PhD, is an American author and somatic psychotherapist. She developed the Somatic Psychology Department at Naropa University and founded The Moving Cycle Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

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Bodyfulness: Somatic Practices for Presence, Empowerment, and Waking Up in This Life

In Bodyfulness, renowned somatic counselor Christine Caldwell offers a practical guide for living an embodied contemplative life, embracing whatever body we are in.

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56:37

18. Bodyfulness for Deeper Mindfulness

Christine Caldwell talks about her new book, Bodyfulness, which is a practice that challenges us to take mindfulness one step further by using our body's knowledge and intuition to make more empowered and informed choices in everyday life.

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Getting in Touch: The Guide to New Body-Centered Therapies

More and more people are turning to new mind-body therapies to address physical and emotional ills.

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Bodyfulness

Somatic Practices for Presence, Empowerment, and Waking Up in This Life

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01:24:45

Bodyfulness talk

A presentation on Bodyfulness - the theory and methods of body-centered practices that can be applied to psychotherapy, the arts, education, and activism

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Oppression and the Body: Roots, Resistance, and Resolutions

Asserting that the body is the main site of oppression in Western society, the contributors to this pioneering volume explore the complex issue of embodiment and how it relates to social inclusion and marginalization.

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01:14:22

Embodiment and Psychology with Don Hanlon Johnson, Dr Albert Wong, and Dr Christine Caldwell

Johnson, Wong and Caldwell have a group discussion about somatics and mind-body-spirit connections.

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Getting Our Bodies Back: Recovery, Healing, and Transformation through Body-Centered Psychotherapy

A habitual movement as common as nail-biting or toe-tapping can be the key to pulling out addictive behavior by its roots. These unconscious movement "tags" indicate the places where our bodies have become split off from our psyches.

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Arnold Mindell