TOPIC

Black Well-Being

Though many minority groups face discrimination and bigotry, certain patterns of intergenerational trauma, othering, and colorism are unique to the Black community within the US, which undergoes the constant stress of racial discrimination, police violence, health-care biases, and generations of economic injustice—among many other systemic stressors. Social pressure and cultural messaging can have a great impact on our feelings of self-worth and can make us struggle with self-acceptance. Everyone has the right to live a vibrant life in their full identity, and the struggle for physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being can find support from those who understand and validate the complexities, nuance, pain, and joy of the community’s lived experiences. We’ve started gathering valuable information on this topic, but haven’t yet curated the findings.

The Value in the Valley: A Black Woman’s Guide Through Life’s Dilemmas

Is it the job you hate but need in order to pay the rent? Is it that relationship that you gave your all to only to end up with a broken heart...again? Perhaps it's your children, a family member, or a life-long friend doing you in, dragging you down, pushing you to the brink.

You Are Your Best Thing: Vulnerability, Shame Resilience, and the Black Experience

Tarana Burke and Dr. Brené Brown bring together a dynamic group of Black writers, organizers, artists, academics, and cultural figures to discuss the topics the two have dedicated their lives to understanding and teaching: vulnerability and shame resilience.

Black and Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us about Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom

Leading African American Buddhist teachers offer lessons on racism, resilience, spiritual freedom, and the possibility of a truly representative American Buddhism. With contributions by Acharya Gaylon Ferguson, Cheryl A.

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Raised by a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in Los Angeles, Patrisse Khan-Cullors experienced firsthand the prejudice and persecution Black Americans endure at the hands of law enforcement. For Patrisse, the most vulnerable people in the country are Black people.

How to Carry Water: Selected Poems of Lucille Clifton

How to Carry Water: Selected Poems of Lucille Clifton celebrates both familiar and lesser-known works by one of America’s most beloved poets, including 10 newly discovered poems that have never been collected.

Oppression and the Body: Roots, Resistance, and Resolutions

Asserting that the body is the main site of oppression in Western society, the contributors to this pioneering volume explore the complex issue of embodiment and how it relates to social inclusion and marginalization.

Black and White: The Way I See It

The fascinating, “upfront and unapologetic” (Kirkus Reviews) memoir of Richard Williams, a businessman, tennis coach, subject of the major motion picture King Richard, and father to two of the greatest athletes and professional tennis champions of all time—Venus and Serena Williams.

Parent Like It Matters: How to Raise Joyful, Change-Making Girls

Renowned sociologist Dr. Janice Johnson Dias has devoted her life to nurturing and training girls to become change-makers—whether through her investment in her daughter Marley’s humanitarian projects or through her work with the GrassROOTS Community Foundation’s “SuperCamp.

Notes of a Native Son

In an age of Black Lives Matter, James Baldwin’s essays on life in Harlem, the protest novel, movies, and African Americans abroad are as powerful today as when they were first written.

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Racism