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Brain Health

A healthy brain means a healthy life—and a healthy life means a healthy brain. While genes and environment affect our brain development, lifestyle is responsible for most types of changes in brain function. The choices we make actively help or hinder how effectively we can process information, retrieve memories, regulate our emotions, communicate clearly, create and imagine, and solve problems. Healthy amounts of quality nutrition, exercise, rest, intellectual and creative stimulation, and social connection are all crucial boosts to the system, while artificial stimulants and suppressants, head injuries, sleep deprivation, and social isolation all have direct tangible impacts on our brain health. We’ve started gathering valuable information on this topic, but haven’t yet curated the findings.

Yoga May Be Good for the Brain

A weekly routine of yoga and meditation may strengthen thinking skills and help to stave off aging-related mental decline, according to a new study of older adults with early signs of memory problems.

What Science Tells Us About Preventing Dementia

There are no instant, miracle cures. But recent studies suggest we have more control over our cognitive health than we might think. It just takes some effort.

How Meditation Protects the Aging Brain from Decline

A string of recent research suggests regular meditation practice may boost mental flexibility and focus, offering powerful protection against cognitive decline.

Why We Can and Must Focus on Preventing Alzheimer’s

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine showed how levels of blood sugar directly relate to risk for dementia.

The 7 Worst Habits for Your Brain

Bad choices and everyday missteps could harm your cognition. Here’s how to combat several of them.

David Perlmutter, MD: The Dynamic Brain

The more that you do something, the more it will ultimately form a more indelible relationship between neurons and neural networks.

Sleeping Too Little in Middle Age May Increase Dementia Risk, Study Finds

The research, tracking thousands of people from age 50 on, suggests those who sleep six hours or less a night are more likely to develop dementia in their late 70s.

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Neuroscience