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Children’s Well-Being



A child with health or mental health challenges may be struggling without your knowing it. Sometimes it is hard to tell the difference between normal childhood emotions and behaviors and those that are a cause for concern. Always start with love, support, communication, and careful observation, taking notes over a week or two to look for patterns in your child. Things to look for include irregular or unusual behaviors, anything from food/sleep changes to fears and anxieties, withdrawal, anger, highs and lows, stomach- or headaches, and altered social interactions.

If you or someone you know is in immediate need of support, please seek professional help. If you are in crisis, here are some immediate free resources.

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05:11

Loss of Appetite in Toddlers – Reasons & Solutions

If your child turns away everything that you serve on the plate, he may be a picky eater. It's certainly worrying when your little one creates a fuss about food regularly. But don’t worry; a loss of appetite in toddlers is a common problem.

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The Snail with the Right Heart: A True Story

The Snail with the Right Heart is a story about time and chance, genetics and gender, love and death, evolution and infinity—concepts often too abstract for the human mind to fathom, often more accessible to the young imagination; concepts made fathomable in the concrete, finite life of one tiny,...

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Childhood Guilt, Adult Depression?

New research shows differences in the brains of kids who show excessive guilty behavior, which may put them at risk for a host of mood disorders later in life.

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05:07

InBrief: Early Childhood Mental Health

Science tells us that the foundations of sound mental health are built early in life. Early experiences—including children’s relationships with parents, caregivers, relatives, teachers, and peers—interact with genes to shape the architecture of the developing brain.

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Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism

The future of our society depends on our gifted children--the population in which we'll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf.

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Complete Guide to Getting Good Care

When a child is struggling, or his behavior worries you, it can be hard to know whether you need to reach out to a professional. And if you do seek help, what kind of professional, and what kind of treatment, are right for your child? This guide is also offered in Spanish.

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07:22

Why You Should Take a Break: Prioritizing Mental Health in Schools | Hailey Hardcastle | TEDxSalem

Hailey Hardcastle is a freshman at the University of Oregon and a student mental health advocate. This year she was named one of Teen Vogues 21 under 21 most influential young people for her work on passing House Bill 2191, which allows students to take mental health days off from school.

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13 Things Strong Kids Do: Think Big, Feel Good, Act Brave

Do you worry that you don’t fit in? Do you feel insecure sometimes? Do you wish your life looked as perfect as everyone else on social media? Do you have anxiety about things you can’t control? Being a tween can be really hard, especially in today’s world.

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What Happened to American Childhood?

Too many kids show worrying signs of fragility from a very young age. Here’s what we can do about it.

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05:55

What Not to Do If a Child Is Self Harming

This video provides advice and ideas for concerned parents, teachers or other adults who want to know what they should and should not say and do if a child or young person discloses that they have been self-harming.

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WHAT MIGHT HELP

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The information offered here is not a substitute for professional advice. Please proceed with care and caution.

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