TOPIC

Death and Dying

The fear of death is deep-seated, hardwired into our bodies and subconscious. But every single living thing—and human being—will go through the process of dying. While we witness it happening to others and know intellectually that it will happen to ourselves, many of us avoid thinking about it as much as possible. But when a culture avoids death, sidelining it from social spaces and public discussion, it can make addressing our discomfort, anxiety, fear, and curiosity about death an isolating experience. When we are then confronted with death close to us, we can have difficulty processing the emotions we are faced with and end up in an existential or spiritual crisis. Many traditions believe that incorporating a healthy discussion of death in day-to-day life actually helps release us from the fear of dying and lets us live freer, more vibrant lives.

Finding Meaning: The Sixth Stage of Grief

In 1969, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross first identified the stages of dying in her transformative book On Death and Dying. Decades later, she and David Kessler wrote the classic On Grief and Grieving, introducing the stages of grief with the same transformative pragmatism and compassion.

Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life

The most recent addition to the Fundamentals of Philosophy series, John Martin Fischer's Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life offers a brief yet in-depth introduction to the key philosophical issues and problems concerning death and immortality.

The Bright Hour: A Memoir of Living and Dying

Poet and essayist Nina Riggs was just thirty-seven years old when initially diagnosed with breast cancer—one small spot. Within a year, she received the devastating news that her cancer was terminal.

Life Lessons: Two Experts on Death and Dying Teach Us About the Mysteries of Life and Living

Ten years after Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s death: “An inspiring…guide to life, distilled from the experiences of people who face death” (Kirkus Reviews)—the beloved classic now with a new introduction and updated resources section.

Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson (10th Anniversary Edition)

Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

The Unwinding of the Miracle: A Memoir of Life, Death, and Everything That Comes After

That Julie Yip-Williams survived infancy was a miracle. Born blind in Vietnam, she narrowly escaped euthanasia at the hands of her grandmother, only to flee with her family the political upheaval of her country in the late 1970s.

WHAT MIGHT HELP

The information offered here is not a substitute for professional advice. Please proceed with care and caution.

UP NEXT

Facing Own Death