TOPIC

LGBTQIA Sexuality



LGBTQIA is an acronym to represent those who do not identify as straight and cisgender (whose gender identity and expression match the sex they were assigned at birth). Acronyms and terms to describe identity are constantly evolving and changing both in use and in meaning, though it is generally accepted to mean lesbian (a woman who is sexually and/or emotionally attracted to other women), gay (a man who is sexually and/or emotionally attracted to other men), bisexual (someone who is sexually and/or emotionally attracted to more than one gender), transgender (someone whose gender identity or expression does not conform to what is expected based on the sex they were assigned at birth), queer (anyone who is not straight or cisgender) or questioning (someone who is not sure how they identify), intersex (someone who naturally has biological traits which do not match typical male or female traits), and asexual (often referred to as “ace,” someone who experiences a low level of or no sexual desire). Other variations include the use of + or * to acknowledge that there are other identities not included in the acronym, such as pansexual (sexually attracted to all genders) or demisexual (where sexual attraction is predicated on an emotional bond).

FindCenter Video Image
11:51

This Is What LGBT Life Is Like Around the World - Jenni Chang and Lisa Dazols - TED Talks

As a gay couple in San Francisco, Jenni Chang and Lisa Dazols had a relatively easy time living the way they wanted.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

The Stonewall Reader

June 28, 2019 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, which is considered the most significant event in the gay liberation movement, and the catalyst for the modern fight for LGBTQ rights in the United States.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

Carl Nassib Made History, but Also a Big Play

Carl Nassib, 28, became the first openly gay player to compete in an N.F.L. game. Teammates, the news media and observers casually noted the feat, then cheered his game-changing play.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

FindCenterSex is difficult; yes. But those tasks that have been entrusted to us are difficult; almost everything serious is difficult; and everything is serious.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image
10:27

The Danger of Hiding Who You Are | Morgana Bailey

Morgana Bailey has been hiding her true self for 16 years. In a brave talk, she utters four words that might not seem like a big deal to some, but to her have been paralyzing. Why speak up? Because she’s realized that her silence has personal, professional and societal consequences.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

Gender Queer: A Memoir

In 2014, Maia Kobabe, who uses e/em/eir pronouns, thought that a comic of reading statistics would be the last autobiographical comic e would ever write. At the time, it was the only thing e felt comfortable with strangers knowing about em. Now, Gender Queer is here.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

Beyond ‘He’ or ‘She’: The Changing Meaning of Gender and Sexuality

Hyperindividual, you-do-you young people from across the U.S. are upending the convention that when it comes to gender and sexuality, there are only two options for each: male or female, gay or straight.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image
14:17

LGBTQueering the Narrative of Sexual Violence—Paige Leigh Baker-Braxton— TEDxChicago

Paige Leigh Baker-Braxton, Psy.D. Dr Baker-Braxton spearheads the development, implementation, and evaluation of the first LGBTQ-specific sexual assault response program in the nation. Dr. Baker-Braxton is also a Clinical Psychologist specializing in LGBT mental health and trauma Psy.D.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image

When We Rise: My Life in the Movement

Born in 1954, Cleve Jones was among the last generation of gay Americans who grew up wondering if there were others out there like himself. There were.

FindCenter AddIcon
FindCenter Video Image
05:55

Coming Out as Gay, then Trans, then a Lesbian.

Over the years, Cecilia came out to her mother first as gay, then as trans, then as a lesbian. Her mom’s and grandma’s reactions were quite different.

FindCenter AddIcon

UP NEXT

LGBTQIA Well-Being