TOPIC

Obsessions/Compulsions



An obsession or compulsion is an unhealthy attention to something or someone. It begins with a thought that is accompanied with anxiety or fear. Because it involves taking an action that results in a relief of the anxiety or fear, a cycle of repetition takes root, leading to greater attachment to both the anxiety and the now compulsive behavior that relieves it. We come to believe that if we don’t do the compulsive behavior, terrible things will happen. Obsessive behavior shows itself in many forms and can include personal cleanliness, environmental manipulations, or bodily actions. The compulsive behavior is in effect addictive for its ability to relieve the fear. There are many good healing approaches to compulsive or obsessive behaviors, which left unchecked often cause harm or result in unwelcome consequences.

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09:42

How to Stop Intrusive and Obsessive Thoughts

In this video, author and depression counselor Douglas Bloch shares four tips on how you can respond to unwanted thoughts and obsessions.

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Can’t. Just. Stop.: An Investigation of Compulsions

Using in-depth case studies to explore how we grapple with compulsion in ourselves and those we love, “Can’t. Just. Stop.” examines the science behind both mild and extreme compulsive behavior.

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Compulsive Behaviors

Compulsive behaviors are actions that are engaged in repeatedly and consistently, despite the fact that they are experienced as aversive or troubling. Yet treatment can help to manage or overcome these difficult patterns.

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10:11

What Are Intrusive Thoughts? [and When They Signal Pure O & OCD]

What are intrusive thoughts really, and when do they signal Pure O & OCD? Obsessive compulsive disorder consists of obsessions and compulsions that interfere with daily life. In this interview, MedCircle host Kyle Kittleson and the world's leading OCD expert, Dr. Jenny Yip discuss...

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Brain Lock: Free Yourself from Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior

An estimated 5 million Americans suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and live diminished lives in which they are compelled to obsess about something or to repeat a similar task over and over. Traditionally, OCD has been treated with Prozac or similar drugs.

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Unhappy with Compulsions?

Are you unhappy with your compulsions? Sadhguru explains how that won’t help while trudging through the loads of Karma which grows more if you bury it.

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08:20

How to Identify Obsessions & Compulsions

Here is my approach for identifying obsessions and compulsions. It's especially useful for identifying compulsions in areas of your life that might not cause too much anxiety.

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Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully

If you’ve been diagnosed with OCD, you already understand how your obsessive thoughts, compulsive behavior, and need for rituals can interfere with everyday life. Maybe you’ve already undergone therapy or are in the midst of working with a therapist.

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Compulsions Can Follow Trauma

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is usually treated as a stand-alone mental illness. A growing body of research is now finding that some cases of OCD may stem from trauma.

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Primarily Obsessional OCD Symptoms and Treatments

When people think of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), they tend to focus on the most obvious compulsions, such as repetitive hand-washing, cleaning or checking on things, or an extreme need for symmetry. While the compulsions are more noticeable, they are only one aspect of this disorder.

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WHAT MIGHT HELP

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The information offered here is not a substitute for professional advice. Please proceed with care and caution.

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