TOPIC

Offering Support to Others



It’s natural that when we see people we care about going through challenges, we want to help. But sometimes we stop ourselves from reaching out—we’re worried that we might say the wrong thing, worried we might not be able to offer enough help to matter, worried we might make things worse. The truth is that there are so many ways we can help each other through hard times, and the most important one is being present with what you have, where you are, with those who are suffering. There are many strategies that can bolster our confidence to help when others ask, and many different skills we can learn to help listen deeply, show compassion, and be there for each other in constructive, meaningful ways.

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08:10

What to Say (and Not Say) to Comfort Someone Who’s Lost a Loved One

How can you comfort someone who’s lost a loved one, experienced a tragedy, or is coping with bad news?

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There Is No Good Card for This: What to Say and Do When Life Is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love

The creator of the viral hit “Empathy Cards” teams up with a compassion expert to produce a visually stunning and groundbreaking illustrated guide to help you increase your emotional intelligence and learn how to offer comfort and support when someone you know is in pain.

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How Not to Say the Wrong Thing

Susan Silk's "Ring Theory" of "comfort in, dump out" when supporting others going through tough times.

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FindCenterA bird was lying on his back in the road with his feet in the air. A horse saw him and asked, “What’re you doing?” The sparrow said, “I’m helping hold back the darkness.” The horse sneered and said, “Yeah, right,” and the sparrow said, “One does what one can.”

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03:22

Thich Nhat Hanh on Compassionate Listening | Super Soul Sunday | Oprah Winfrey Network

Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh says listening can help end the suffering of an individual, put an end to war and change the world for the better. Watch as he explains how to practice compassionate listening.

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It’s OK that You’re Not OK: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture that Doesn’t Understand

In It’s OK that You’re Not OK, Megan Devine offers a profound new approach to both the experience of grief and the way we try to help others who have endured tragedy.

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Helping Someone Who’s Grieving

Is someone you know grieving a loss? Learn what to say and how to comfort someone through bereavement, grief, and loss.

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FindCenterThe first question which the priest and the Levite asked was: ‘If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?’ But the good Samaritan reversed the question: ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?’

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13:11

How to Connect with Depressed Friends | Bill Bernat

Learn some dos and don'ts for talking to people living with depression and handle your next conversation with grace and maybe a bit of humor.

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The Greatest Beer Run Ever: A Memoir of Friendship, Loyalty, and War

One night in 1967, twenty-six-year-old John Donohue—known as Chick—was out with friends, drinking in a New York City bar. The friends gathered there had lost loved ones in Vietnam. Now they watched as antiwar protesters turned on the troops themselves.

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