TOPIC

Social Justice

Social justice means equal rights and equal opportunities for each member of society, and it especially pertains to those in greatest need. The concept serves as an equalizing lens through which we can evaluate, change, and reinvigorate all of our social systems and structures to serve everyone in a fair, balanced, and equitable way. Social justice applies to how land and water are distributed and used; to who has access to education, jobs, health care, political office, housing, and legal support; to how people are talked to and treated in social spaces; and much more.

Black Women and Social Justice Education: Legacies and Lessons

Black Women and Social Justice Education explores Black women’s experiences and expertise in teaching and learning about justice in a range of formal and informal educational settings.

Love Without Reason: The Lost Art of Giving a F*ck

If the world’s problems feel overwhelming and making a difference seems impossible, you’re not alone. So many of us wish we could be doing something good and purposeful, but we get stuck.

Race Matters, 25th Anniversary: With a New Introduction

First published in 1993, on the one-year anniversary of the Los Angeles riots, Race Matters became a national best seller that has gone on to sell more than half a million copies. This classic treatise on race contains Dr.

Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

Former public defender James Forman, Jr. is a leading critic of mass incarceration and its disproportionate impact on people of color.

The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life, Freedom, and Justice

In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free.

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Raised by a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in Los Angeles, Patrisse Khan-Cullors experienced firsthand the prejudice and persecution Black Americans endure at the hands of law enforcement. For Patrisse, the most vulnerable people in the country are Black people.

We Will Not Cancel Us: And Other Dreams of Transformative Justice

“Cancel” or “call-out” culture is a source of much tension and debate in American society. The infamous "Harper’s Letter,” signed by public intellectuals of both the left and right, sought to settle the matter and only caused greater division.

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together

The Sum of Us is a brilliant analysis of how we arrived here: divided and self-destructing, materially rich but spiritually starved and vastly unequal.

Prophetic Fragments: Illuminations of the Crisis in American Religion and Culture

This collection of writings, drawn from a wide variety of sources, reveals the intellectual depth and breadth of the author. The articles include political commentary, cultural critique, literary analysis, extended book reviews, and even a short story by Cornel West.

Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement

In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.

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Racial Justice