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Talk Therapy

Talk therapy, also known as psychotherapy, is the process of meeting with a counselor or therapist in order to discuss personal situations and work to overcome difficulties. The basic idea is that talking about our problems can help us to overcome them, and that sometimes it is not enough to discuss things with a family member or a trusted friend. In these cases, talking to a neutral third party who has training in dealing with various forms of emotional distress can often be very helpful in discerning what the problem is and how to confront it. Therapists provide a safe, nonjudgmental space in which to discuss sensitive subjects such as trauma, relationship issues, feelings of grief or loss, or the experience of anxiety or depression. Once we have talked about whatever stressors or issues are affecting our life, a therapist can help us determine strategies for coping with our distress and finding ways to mitigate it. There are countless modalities of therapy available, tailored to whatever concerns one might specifically want to address. We’ve started gathering valuable information on this topic, but haven’t yet curated the findings.

Sigmund Freud's Life and Contributions to Psychology

Sigmund Freud was an Austrian neurologist who is perhaps most known as the founder of psychoanalysis. Freud's developed a set of therapeutic techniques centered on talk therapy that involved the use of strategies such as transference, free association, and dream interpretation.

Why Your Self-Image Might Be Wrong: Ego, Buddhism and Freud

"You" might not be as real as you think you are. Here's what Buddhism has to say about living ego-free, and how Freud misunderstood it.

Does Your Ego Serve You, or Do You Serve It? What Buddhism and Freud Say About Self-Slavery

"Buddhist psychology and Western psychotherapy both hold out hope for a more flexible ego, one that does not pit the individual against everyone else in a futile attempt to gain total surety."

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The information offered here is not a substitute for professional advice. Please proceed with care and caution.

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Psychology